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BCS Tractors?

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BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:47 am

These are two-wheeled tractors similar to old David Bradleys, that are made for small farmers. Lots of implements available, from mowers to hay rakes to plows to water pumps.

Anybody familiar with them? I saw them yesterday at a display at our county Fairgrounds and am intrigued. I know they’re popular in Europe.

https://bcsamerica.com/products/tractors#harvester
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby led » Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:31 am

Bkeeper
I don't know this tractor per se but I know after about an hour of
following/wrestling one around you will want a s.o.m.b. tractor (sit on my but.)
led
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Red Dave » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:25 am

Never heard of BCS before, but my Dad had a David Bradley we used in the farm garden, my neighbor has a big Troy Built roto-tiller that I have used to work up my garden with and we had a couple Gravely's where I worked that we used to push snow with, so I am quite familiar with the machine type.

All in all, I used them when I was a lot younger and they are beasts. When they hit a rock, you better have a good hold on them. At my age (our age?), I have zero interest in running anything like that ever again.

All in all, led is right. Give me a tractor seat any day.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:01 am

Thanks for your input, guys. I do still own and have used the David Bradley...and I'll keep at least one of the "sit down" tractors no matter what I do.

But I did a little more research on the web, and then went and spent about an hour with a sales rep and the equipment on Sunday at a local Fair, and have to say I was very impressed.

The equipment is very well designed, and appears to be well made. I wish this had been available here when we first moved to our farm, because I probably would have done some things differently. These folks have fixed many of the short-comings of my David Bradley, and actually increased the number and type of implements and reliability.

I've got some wide-open flat pasture, but I've also got lots of hills and a lot of ditches/ravines that I can't tractor easily.

So, I think I'm likely to buy one of the models (trying to decide which one) and at least several attachments sometime before the summer is out.

I appreciate you both giving me your input, it was helpful in keeping me from going overboard before I've done all my homework. :D
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby screamer » Tue Jun 05, 2018 4:14 am

The BCS tractors are great for the half acre Harry's of the world. If you have a few acres, they are largely too small and too underpowered. The old David bradley was meant to fill a niche for the rural small owner who just wanted to garden. Plowed a small plot just fine. Mowed tall grass and pushed snow. Cultivate the garden, etc. For folks with a growing family that needed a garden that was too big for turning it over by hand with a shovel, they were great. But along came the smaller real tractor's the Farmall A's, the Allis Chalmer A's, the Ford n series. They were great for the ten acre folks who raised a huge garden and perhaps some extra to sell. Small modern compact tractors are expensive. But the IH low boys and some other small 2wd tractors are cheaper than a BCS. I am in fairly good shape for my age, but just walk behind tilling a new garden plot about 10 x 20 in our ground will send the healthiest person to the chiropractor. My neighbor bought a BCS to mow banks too steep for the lawn tractor and to till inside her hoop house. She found it too tough to handle on banks and found going to raised beds in the hoop house was far easier. So the thing sets unused. She does use one of those mantis tillers to till the 36 inch high table top raised beds in her hoop house. But that soil is all commercial greenhouse soil that never saw a pebble.

This spring, I used the 50 hp tractor and plow to plow my last year new garden. I plowed it as deep as I could get the plow to go. Then picked up rocks. I plowed again and picked up rocks. I rototilled and picked up more rocks and stones. Rototilled the next day and picked up another 5 gallon bucket of stones. I went and got a load of compost from our pile and added that to the garden. Rototilled that it and picked up another half bucket of rocks. I then added two 40 pound bags of sand and a bale of peat moss and rototilled that in. I still picked out a few pounds of rocks and stones. I finally planted the garden. Keep in mind that this was after doing the exact same thing last year. Maybe in a year or two the garden will be something a BCS could whiz through. But not in this geography with the rocky soil in general.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:09 am

Thanks, Screamer, good food for thought.

I have a lot more than 1/2 an acre, and will keep my N and/or TO30 to take care of the big stuff. I, too, have a "mantis" (mine's a Stihl, which I do love) and a large garden. I use the N/TO to do "rough" tillage of the garden, and then lay out vegetable rows with a middlebuster. Then I use either a push plow or rototiller, depending on what is going in the row, to prep the soil in the row itself. I've been hauling rocks out of the garden for at least 15 years now, and even the mantis goes through the rows well enough.

But I've got lots of slopes/ditches and fenceline, which I had hoped to use the BCS for. I have to keep thinking on it based on your input about your neighbor. Thanks again.

Tom
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Red Dave » Tue Jun 05, 2018 7:02 am

screamer wrote:
This spring, I used the 50 hp tractor and plow to plow my last year new garden. I plowed it as deep as I could get the plow to go. Then picked up rocks. I plowed again and picked up rocks. I rototilled and picked up more rocks and stones. Rototilled the next day and picked up another 5 gallon bucket of stones. I went and got a load of compost from our pile and added that to the garden. Rototilled that it and picked up another half bucket of rocks. I then added two 40 pound bags of sand and a bale of peat moss and rototilled that in. I still picked out a few pounds of rocks and stones. I finally planted the garden. Keep in mind that this was after doing the exact same thing last year. Maybe in a year or two the garden will be something a BCS could whiz through. But not in this geography with the rocky soil in general.


:D This area has been farmed since the early 1700's. The settlers and then farmers picked rocks from the fields continuously since then. They built houses, barns, fence lines, bridges, roads, anything that can be built out of rocks. Yet to this day, every time a farmer tills a field they will turn up more rocks. I have a theory that the soil is so fertile that it grows the little stones into big rocks. :roll:

I have plowed in contests in other places where there are no rocks. It seems weird to go along without hitting a rock. I wonder how many centuries it will take to use up all the rocks? :P
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Tue Jun 05, 2018 8:00 am

Red Dave wrote:...Yet to this day, every time a farmer tills a field they will turn up more rocks. I have a theory that the soil is so fertile that it grows the little stones into big rocks. :roll: ...


I've said since about a year after I bought this place: the one thing I can grow exceptionally well here is rocks... :D
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby screamer » Tue Jun 05, 2018 8:56 am

Had a buddy in southern delaware who had no rocks anywhere on his property except the base under his driveway. His garden was such sandy soil that he could rototill through it with one hand.

At the old house location we had a garden that had been used as a garden for 50 years. Yes, still some rocks, but at one end, the soil was so loose and full of matter that you could poke your fingers straight down to the palm with no problem. So much manure and compost added over the years that the garden was a foot higher then the surrounding yard.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby mowmud » Wed Jun 06, 2018 1:15 am

I've found that anything that runs on gas or diesel is easier. Just gotta hump fuel.

You are correct. If you are buying, do your research. There is no substitute. If you need parts, how far do you have to go? Or wait... if you order online?

I associate with folks that own their own personal saw mills, the dealership, Wood-Mizer is only about 10 ridges over west. They don't break down much, but its nice if you need a new band or just dull ones sharpened.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:48 am

mowmud wrote:I've found that anything that runs on gas or diesel is easier. Just gotta hump fuel.

You are correct. If you are buying, do your research. There is no substitute. If you need parts, how far do you have to go? Or wait... if you order online?

I associate with folks that own their own personal saw mills, the dealership, Wood-Mizer is only about 10 ridges over west. They don't break down much, but its nice if you need a new band or just dull ones sharpened.


There are about 11 or 12 full-service dealers within an hour of me, and two within 35 minutes. So parts and service should be no problem. Limited life-time warranty, too. The weather is probably going to push me towards an earlier purchase than I might normally--the brush, briars and honeysuckle are all taking off like crazy this year, particularly in some of the rougher, small space areas that I want something to mow...the brush hook and scythe--or roundup--are my alternatives, but each has some "cons" attached to the pros.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bamabear » Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:02 am

I had a Bradley one, It cut like a tractor,but I could not handle it, I think that is why I had my disk replacement in my neck,, I would rather have a small tractor and will buy one when I retire...… now I got a homemade tiller, ME! worked my whole garden the other day with a hoe and rake.....
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:39 am

Bamabear wrote:I had a Bradley one, It cut like a tractor,but I could not handle it, I think that is why I had my disk replacement in my neck,, I would rather have a small tractor and will buy one when I retire...… now I got a homemade tiller, ME! worked my whole garden the other day with a hoe and rake.....


BB, I still have an old David Bradley, and there's no comparison between these new 2-wheel tractors and--at least--my old David Bradley. It is like comparing a '30s era farm tractor to a modern farm tractor--they're about the same shape and appearance, but the ease of use and capability aren't even close. If I only had 2 or 3 acres to worry about, I'd probably get rid of my 8N and Ferguson tractors and use the BCS exclusively.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby Bkeepr » Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:02 pm

Well, yesterday I ordered a model 749 tractor with two (for now) attachments: a 53" sickle-bar mower and a 32" brush-hog. Other attachments to follow, once I've played with it awhile at my place.

At the dealer they had one set up for demo, so I got a chance to play with it. It is similar to the David Bradley in size, but that's about where the comparison ends. This thing is very well balanced, and a lot more flexible and maneuverable.
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Re: BCS Tractors?

Postby mowmud » Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:35 pm

Everybody deserves a new machine once in awhile.I wanna see pics. New machines are great. It is how long they last. I think most of us on here, if they can get 20 years out of it, we're good. What color is it? Do you mow hills? New stuff is not like the old stuff, but is much more user friendly.
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