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Learning

Postby mowmud » Fri Aug 14, 2020 12:26 am

My good friend positronium grows a certain type of bamboo that even stays green most of the winter. Yeah... winter, I know.
Doesn't get near as big as the bamboo down south.

I want to build a pack basket that I can wear on my back.I have bought one store bought one, but it didn't fit me right. I'm gonna make one that fits me. I've used his bamboo in the past to make runners for my hops. A lot of people grow hops around here so it is now hard to barter. I mowed them down.
They'll still grow if I let them.

Ole Posi doesn't know I'm gonna come and raid his bamboo crop again. Once he sees me start building a basket, he'll either help me make mine better, or he'll start making his own.

Generally, it is a one person project, but if he needs help, I'm more than willing to offer. He has already helped me by maintaining a bamboo patch... that I have the luxury of raiding without getting shot at.

Them baskets come in most handy in the winter months.

I don't know what type of bamboo it is, but I think it will work for what I plan to do with it.

Or maybe I'll just make two and give him one. Posi ain't like that though. He would appreciate the gift, But he is a hands on person. He won't be satisfied until he does it himself. I really appreciate that quality in a person.
mowmud
 
Posts: 8714
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 9:20 pm
Location: Ira, NY

Re: Learning

Postby mowmud » Fri Aug 14, 2020 1:35 am

I've learned some more. Local history. This history is not so good.
I've talked about that limestone quarry kinda close to here. A couple ridges over. It was used to make gunpowder, but this is older than that. The old railroad bed is still there, the tracks have been gone a long time, I call it the 'state trail', I always knew it for a railroad, just never cared.

There , which used to be called Ira Station. It was a bustling place, I go out there with my metal detector. I find a bunch of spikes and steel plates.

Well back to the bad stuff. There was a foundry there. They cast iron. Made the first plows ever invented for mass production.(Railroad) I can't remember the name of it right now, but I think it starts with an "R". Nevermind that.

The plows that they made, very few got used around here. They all got loaded on the train and were moved out west in the early thirties. Our plows created the dustbowl. They were made right here in Ira.

I still can't figure out why they didn't keep the plows here. Somebody chasing the almighty dollar.
mowmud
 
Posts: 8714
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 9:20 pm
Location: Ira, NY

Re: Learning

Postby mowmud » Thu Aug 20, 2020 9:06 pm

And yet more learning. I've talked about sharpening chainsaw chains in past posts. Well, my new to me, electric chain grinder has taught me some things. My past ways of hand filing have always worked pretty good. The grinder didn't come with a manual, so I watched some u-tubes and came up with a plan even though none of the grinders featured were identical to mine.
I set it up and practiced on an old beat chain. It got the angle and the yaw back into shape really well. It left a big burr on the cutting edge(leading) of the tooth. Me and Posi debated over it. Two heads are better than one. He's never used an electric one either.
Well, he went home, and I got to playing around with the angles on the grinder and it can be set up 180* opposite angle and yaw. The teeth come out now with a very nice chisel point without the burr.

That taken into account, I started thinking about the way I've always hand sharpened. Just for hits and giggles, I hand sharpened my user saw the opposite way. Whoa! It appears to be much sharper, I haven't sawed with it yet. It's easier too. I hope the chain cuts as well as it seems to be sharp. Time will tell.
mowmud
 
Posts: 8714
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 9:20 pm
Location: Ira, NY

Re: Learning

Postby Bkeepr » Fri Aug 21, 2020 4:21 am

mowmud wrote:And yet more learning. I've talked about sharpening chainsaw chains in past posts. Well, my new to me, electric chain grinder has taught me some things. My past ways of hand filing have always worked pretty good. The grinder didn't come with a manual, so I watched some u-tubes and came up with a plan even though none of the grinders featured were identical to mine.
I set it up and practiced on an old beat chain. It got the angle and the yaw back into shape really well. It left a big burr on the cutting edge(leading) of the tooth. Me and Posi debated over it. Two heads are better than one. He's never used an electric one either.
Well, he went home, and I got to playing around with the angles on the grinder and it can be set up 180* opposite angle and yaw. The teeth come out now with a very nice chisel point without the burr.

That taken into account, I started thinking about the way I've always hand sharpened. Just for hits and giggles, I hand sharpened my user saw the opposite way. Whoa! It appears to be much sharper, I haven't sawed with it yet. It's easier too. I hope the chain cuts as well as it seems to be sharp. Time will tell.


After years of sharpening my saws by hand, I finally bought a chain saw sharpener this past Spring. I bought it new, so it came with instructions. I sharpened up dozens of old chains I had thrown in piles over the years as they got so dull I couldn't get them to hand sharpen anymore...but just couldn't bring myself to throw them away.

I have to say the electric sharpener has paid for itself already-- those old, abused chains are cutting like they are new. I may not have to buy a new chain again for the rest of my life. :D
Bkeepr
 
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Location: The People's Democratic Republic of Maryland

Re: Learning

Postby mowmud » Sat Aug 22, 2020 8:03 pm

It is good to hear that others have had similar experiences. Any hints or tips you could share?
Even links to u-tube, I get tired of watching stuff. I get watching them, then see something that looks right, I go out and try it. Doesn't always work out so well. A good link would be great.

I don't like to pull my chain off every time I sharpen. I prefer hand sharpening. When a chain gets out of whack, its nice to have a machine that puts it back into a workable shape.

The more I ask people about this sharpener, they tell me it is like using synthetic oil in a vehicle. Once you start using it, you gotta keep on doing that. I don't want that.

Still, my 'new' method is untested. Last time I cut, I was trying to finish the pile. Wore my back out. Haven't been able to stand up straight the last 3 or 4 days. I have about an hours worth of cutting left. Looking forward to it.
Thanks for your input Bkeepr.
mowmud
 
Posts: 8714
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 9:20 pm
Location: Ira, NY

Re: Learning

Postby mowmud » Sat Sep 05, 2020 4:46 am

I finally finished off the stack. The chain cut great. Ran out of wood to saw.

I've only been bucking with it. Haven't felled any with it. If bucking is any indication, I don't think it will have any problems.

Now all I got to do is split and move and stack the spoils to make way for the second load. I probably won't have enough time to saw the second, but at least it will be here... and not there.
I love my chainsaws. Couldn't do it with a bow saw. Bow saws are for camping.

My new saw is so quiet, only rated at 117 decibels. Makes me wonder how loud my old Mac is.
mowmud
 
Posts: 8714
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 9:20 pm
Location: Ira, NY


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